Suzer

prettybooks:

It’s Banned Books Week!I think I speak for all of us when I say that challenging or banning books just makes us want to read them more. Here’s what I’ve been reading this week so far on the subject of books and censorship:

Banned Books Week.orgThe Top 10 Challenged TitlesBooks Challenged or Banned 2012-2013 11 Quotes From Authors On Censorship & Banned Books15 Books Banned For The Most Absurd Reasons Ever12 Crazy Reasons Why Books Have Been Banned12 Signs You’re A Banned Book ReaderOn the “Banned” Wagon: The Month in Book ChallengesAmerica’s Most Surprising Banned Books A Chat With Rainbow Rowell About Love and CensorshipPenguin Presents: Authors Stand Up for Free SpeechPatrick Ness’s Top 10 ‘Unsuitable’ Books for TeenagersGiving Voice to the Voiceless: Author Ellen Hopkins
maptacular:

​Lawrence Of Arabia’s Hand-Drawn, WWI Map Is Up for Auction
“Next month, Sotheby’s London will offer for sale T.E. Lawrence’s hand-drawn, annotated map of northern Arabia, detailing the route he followed in the days preceding the capture of the Red Sea port of Aqaba in 1917—a victory that would prove decisive in the Arab uprising against the Ottoman Empire in World War I.”
via io9

maptacular:

​Lawrence Of Arabia’s Hand-Drawn, WWI Map Is Up for Auction

Next month, Sotheby’s London will offer for sale T.E. Lawrence’s hand-drawn, annotated map of northern Arabia, detailing the route he followed in the days preceding the capture of the Red Sea port of Aqaba in 1917—a victory that would prove decisive in the Arab uprising against the Ottoman Empire in World War I.”

via io9

nprglobalhealth:

It’s All About The Girls: Is The World Listening To Them?
"My shoes wear out from walking to school, and then I can’t go because we can’t afford new shoes," says a girl from Indonesia.
"I want to live freely," says another girl, in Egypt. "I don’t want people to dictate what I do. No one to control us, no one to hit us, no one to tell us what clothes to wear."
In Congo, a girl starts to list her chores: “Tidying the house, fetching water, preparing meals,” she says. “There are so many I can’t even name them all.”
Their voices are part of a chorus of more than 500 girls, ages 10 to 19, from 14 developing countries. They’ve shared their challenges and dreams with the Girl Declaration, a campaign started last year by the Nike Foundation.
The aim: to change the way the world thinks about girls, says Lyric Thompson at the International Center for Research on Women, which worked with Nike on the project.
Writing this week in the journal Science, Melinda Gates says that “no society can achieve its potential with half of its population marginalized and disempowered.”
They are the “engines” of global development, writes the co-chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. And they should be at the center of development plans and goals.
Continue reading and see more photos.
Photo: "I want to grow up and become a police. But I need to study in a good school for that. I want to become a police to protect the country." - Fiza, 13, India (Courtesy of Nike Foundation)

nprglobalhealth:

It’s All About The Girls: Is The World Listening To Them?

"My shoes wear out from walking to school, and then I can’t go because we can’t afford new shoes," says a girl from Indonesia.

"I want to live freely," says another girl, in Egypt. "I don’t want people to dictate what I do. No one to control us, no one to hit us, no one to tell us what clothes to wear."

In Congo, a girl starts to list her chores: “Tidying the house, fetching water, preparing meals,” she says. “There are so many I can’t even name them all.”

Their voices are part of a chorus of more than 500 girls, ages 10 to 19, from 14 developing countries. They’ve shared their challenges and dreams with the Girl Declaration, a campaign started last year by the Nike Foundation.

The aim: to change the way the world thinks about girls, says Lyric Thompson at the International Center for Research on Women, which worked with Nike on the project.

Writing this week in the journal Science, Melinda Gates says that “no society can achieve its potential with half of its population marginalized and disempowered.”

They are the “engines” of global development, writes the co-chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. And they should be at the center of development plans and goals.

Continue reading and see more photos.

Photo: "I want to grow up and become a police. But I need to study in a good school for that. I want to become a police to protect the country." - Fiza, 13, India (Courtesy of Nike Foundation)

(via npr)

npr:

amnhnyc:

Lonesome George, the last Pinta Island giant tortoise, was unveiled at the Museum this afternoon. He will be on public view for just over 3 months, through January 4, 2015. Museum scientists worked closely with taxidermy experts to preserve Lonesome George as he appeared in life. 
Learn more about Lonesome George. 

A recent Radiolab episode about the Galapagos featured the tale of ‘Lonesome George.’ 
More on the solitary tortoise from NPR:
Bidding Farewell to Lonesome George
'Lonesome George,' the Galapagos Giant Tortoise
-Kate

npr:

amnhnyc:

Lonesome George, the last Pinta Island giant tortoise, was unveiled at the Museum this afternoon. He will be on public view for just over 3 months, through January 4, 2015. Museum scientists worked closely with taxidermy experts to preserve Lonesome George as he appeared in life. 

Learn more about Lonesome George

A recent Radiolab episode about the Galapagos featured the tale of ‘Lonesome George.’ 

More on the solitary tortoise from NPR:

Bidding Farewell to Lonesome George

'Lonesome George,' the Galapagos Giant Tortoise

-Kate

maptacular:

The Evolution of the Death Penalty in One Map
“By 2009, all death-penalty states had made lethal injection the sole or primary execution method for death row inmates, despite problems with the method that have been evident since the 1950s. Now, the death penalty is transforming once again, due to a shortage in the drug used in the three-drug protocol to paralyze the inmate during his execution. As a result, states have resorted to hunting for a replacement in unusual places, such as domestic compounding pharmacies. Some have changed their protocols to use just one drug, or tried to replace the missing drug with new drugs. Others have put executions on hold. In states such as Louisiana, Tennessee, and Wyoming, there’s even been talk of reintroducing the electric chair. This has led to a spate of ethical problems and legal challenges.”
Via The New Republic

maptacular:

The Evolution of the Death Penalty in One Map

By 2009, all death-penalty states had made lethal injection the sole or primary execution method for death row inmates, despite problems with the method that have been evident since the 1950s. Now, the death penalty is transforming once again, due to a shortage in the drug used in the three-drug protocol to paralyze the inmate during his execution. As a result, states have resorted to hunting for a replacement in unusual places, such as domestic compounding pharmacies. Some have changed their protocols to use just one drug, or tried to replace the missing drug with new drugs. Others have put executions on hold. In states such as Louisiana, Tennessee, and Wyoming, there’s even been talk of reintroducing the electric chair. This has led to a spate of ethical problems and legal challenges.”

Via The New Republic